QUBO

MAINTENANCE AND CARE

Water: Water your plant twice a day or every time the soil starts to become dry to touch. Never allow the soil to dry out. Avoid getting the leaves wet when watering and water directly at the base of the plant. Use a spray bottle or sprinkler when watering.

Light: Your plant will grow exceptionally well in a place that receives six (6) hours of sun a day, but may survive on at least four (4) hours of sun a day. Arugula will do just fine on a sunny windowsill.

Fertilizing: Your plant will require fertilizer once a month. Always use organic fertilizer when feeding your plant.

Pruning: Simply snip leaves at the stems at their bases when they are 2 to 6 inches long. Don’t prune more than one-third of the stems on a plant because this can weaken the plant and prevent it from producing more leaves. Occasionally picking younger leaves off your plants will allow them to develop larger leaves with a stronger flavor while making room for new growth. If your plant has started bolt, meaning flower or seed, remove flowering stems to prolong harvest. Regular pruning encourages a more rounded, less leggy plant.

TROUBLESHOOTING

Pests:

Diseases:

HARVEST AND PRESERVE

Harvest: Leaves may be harvested at any point before flowering. Use the fresh leaves as soon as you have clipped them off. Keep in mind that older leaves will have a stronger flavor than younger ones. Flowering causes leaves to taste bitter, so harvesting is preferentially done before signs of blooming Cut off any flowers if you want the plant to keep producing leaves.

Preserve: You may either refrigerate or freeze arugula leaves

  • Refrigerate fresh arugula leaves in the refrigerator for up to 5 days, but they are highly perishable and best used immediately after harvest.
  • Freeze arugula by packing the leaves tightly in an airtight container or plastic bag with a paper towel to absorb moisture. Once frozen, leaves will keep for as long as 6 months.

CULINARY

  • Smokey Arugula and Apple Salad
  • Sauteed Shrimps with Arugula and Tomatoes
  • Arugula with Roasted Salmon and Potatoes

OTHER INFO

  • Arugula is a popular salad green with a very distinct peppery flavor. The reason the Rocquette variety earned its nickname is actually that of its exceptionally fast growth speed.
  • Arugula is also a secret sexy food that’s a revered libido booster. In ancient Rome, Arugula was famous because of its supposed aphrodisiac properties. Powerful love potions were made using arugula along with other herbs like lavender.
  • Arugula is an excellent source of fiber, vitamins A, C (to boost the immune system), and K (for bone strength), folate, calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium, and manganese. Eat arugula as raw and fresh as possible to get the maximum amount of nutrients as possible.

MAINTENANCE AND CARE

Water: Water your plant twice a day or every time the soil starts to become dry to touch. Never allow the soil to dry out. Avoid getting the leaves wet when watering and water directly at the base of the plant. Use a spray bottle or sprinkler when watering.

Light: If you live in a cool climate, plant your cilantro in an area which receives atleast six (6) hours of sun a day. If you live in a hot climate or are expecting hot weather, plant your cilantro in a location which receives three to six (3-6) hours of sun a day.

Fertilizing: Your plant will require fertilizer once a month. Always use organic fertilizer when feeding your plant.

Pruning: Pruning isn’t necessary until your plant is ready for harvest. Once ready, simple snip the stems at their bases when they are 4 to 6 inches long. Don’t prune more than one-third of the stems on a plant because this can weaken the plant and prevent it from producing more leaves. Cilantro also sometimes develops yellow, scorched or damaged leaves in sunny spots or due to pests or diseases. Snip off yellow, wilted and other unsightly leaves at their bases.

TROUBLESHOOTING

Pests:

Diseases:

HARVEST AND PRESERVE

Harvest: Leaves may be harvested at any point before flowering. Use the fresh leaves as soon as you have clipped them off. Once a plant has reached maturity, harvest the larger leaves near the bottom of the plant. Cut off any flowers if you want to the plant to keep producing leaves. To harvest the seeds, let the plant flower. You can pick them when still green and fresh, for a unique and strong flavor, or allow them to turn brown and begin to dry on the plant. Pick stalks and fully dry the seeds hanging upside down in a paper bag. Cilantro also has a taproot that is nutritious and hearty which can be accessed by pulling up the entire plant.

Preserve: Leaves be stored in the refrigerator for up to a week in a plastic bag. Optionally, you may place the cut ends in a jar of water (which should be changed every two days) with a plastic bag over the leaves. Store fresh green seeds in the refrigerator for 1–2 weeks. Dried seeds will keep best in an airtight container in a dry, dark, cool place; Grind as needed.

CULINARY

  • Avocado, Cucumber, and Cilantro Salad
  • Cilantro Chimichurri
  • Cilantro-Lime Chicken

OTHER INFO

  • There are many people who find the taste of cilantro repulsive. Some describe it as leaving a soapy taste in their mouths. According to a 2012 study, scientists found that variations in an individual’s olfactory receptor genes, which help us smell, were likely the culprit for some savoring this herb and others avoiding it like the plague.
  • The whole plant is edible! Yes, that’s right, from the leaves to the stems, roots, and seeds. But the seeds should never be used in place of the leaves and vice versa when called for in recipes.
  • Fresh coriander leaves don’t have a long shelf life after being cut from the plant. Additionally, their aroma is completely lost when dried or frozen.

MAINTENANCE AND CARE

Water: Water your plant twice a day or every time the soil starts to become dry to touch. Never allow the soil to dry out. Avoid getting the leaves wet when watering and water directly at the base of the plant. Use a spray bottle or sprinkler when watering.

Light: Your plant will grow exceptionally well in a place that receives six (6) hours of sun a day. Will benefit from light shade in the heat of summer. Dill will do just fine on a sunny windowsill.

Fertilizing: Your plant will require fertilizer once a month. Always use organic fertilizer when feeding your plant.

Pruning: Cut off leaves where they join the main stem. Prune out dead foliage at any time during the growing period. Cut the dead foliage off where it joins to a healthy stem. If your plant has started bolt, meaning flower or seed, remove flowering stems to prolong harvest.

TROUBLESHOOTING

Pests:

Diseases:

HARVEST AND PRESERVE

Harvest: Leaves may be harvested at any point before flowering. The plants leaves are at the peak of flavor when the flowers are just opening. Use the fresh leaves as soon as you have clipped. Dill flowers can be used for pickling. To harvest the seeds, let the plant flower. Pick  seeds from the plant as soon as the seeds have turned brown, approximately 2–3 weeks after the plant has started flowering.

Preserve: You may either dry or freeze dill leaves

  • Dry dill by hanging stems upside down in a dark, sheltered location. Poke adequate air holes in the bag for ventilation. Once the leaves are good and dry (about a week), you can crumble them into an airtight container.
  • Freeze dill by packing the leaves tightly in an airtight container or plastic bag with a paper towel to absorb moisture before placing in the freezer. Simply break off chunks as needed for garden-fresh flavor in recipes.

CULINARY

  • Salmon with Lemon and Dill
  • DIll Pickles
  • Dill Potato Salad

OTHER INFO

  • It is known as a spice used in many sour dishes, especially sauerkraut and pickled cucumbers. You will find dill used in lemon sauces for fish, yogurt, sour cream, salad dressings, spinach dishes, chicken and lamb casseroles.
  • Provides Provides significant amounts of vitamin A, iron, manganese, and calcium.

Its use spread to Central Europe by medieval times via monasteries, where it was grown as a medicinal herb according to Charlemagne’s Capitulare de villis.

MAINTENANCE AND CARE

Water: Water your plant twice a day or every time the soil starts to become dry to touch. Never allow the soil to dry out. Avoid getting the leaves wet when watering and water directly at the base of the plant. Use a spray bottle or sprinkler when watering.

Light: Your plant will grow exceptionally well in a place that receives six (6) hours of sun a day, but may survive on at least four (4) hours of sun a day. Basil will do just fine on a sunny windowsill.

Fertilizing: Your plant will require fertilizer once a month. Always use organic fertilizer when feeding your plant.

Pruning: Fennel does not require a great deal of pruning to keep up its productivity. That said, plants that are grown as a perennial can be cut back by removing old or weak-looking branches to encourage new growth.

TROUBLESHOOTING

Pests:

Diseases:

HARVEST AND PRESERVE

Harvest: Leaves and stems may be harvested as soon as they begin to mature by cutting off sprigs as needed, or the whole plant may be harvested by cutting the main stalk just above the soil surface. Seeds may be harvested once they turn grey/green. They may be harvested up until they turn dark brown but will likely fall to the ground before you are able to collect them, so be sure to keep an eye on the progress of your plant if you are planning to store seed.                       

Preserve: You can dry fennel leaves

  • Dry fennel by hanging stems upside down in a dark, sheltered location. Poke adequate air holes in the bag for ventilation. Once the leaves are good and dry (about a week), you can crumble them into an airtight container.

CULINARY

  • Fennel and Cinnamon Roast Chicken and Lemons with Potato Wedges

  • Salmon Bean Salad

  • Roasted Fennel Pesto with Fennel Fronds, Toasted Almonds, and Garlic

OTHER INFO

  • Many cultures have used fennel seeds as an appetite suppressant. They were utilized in Medieval England by churchgoers as a way to deal with hunger pangs on days of fasting.
  • Absinthe is famous beverage made of fennel, wormwood and anise. It was initially developed for medical purposes, but it soon became popular as alcoholic drink.
  • Fennel has antispasmodic (relieves muscle spasms) properties. It is used to relax smooth muscles of respiratory and intestinal tract and uterine wall.

MAINTENANCE AND CARE

Water: Water your plant twice a day or every time the soil starts to become dry to touch. Garlic chives require moderate to high levels of water, so never allow the soil to dry out. Avoid getting the leaves wet when watering and water directly at the base of the plant. Use a spray bottle or sprinkler when watering.

Light: Your plant will grow exceptionally well in a place that receives six (6) hours of sun a day, but may survive on at least four (4) hours of sun a day. This plant prefers full sun or partial shade and will grow indoors by a window that receives sunlight.

Fertilizing: Your plant will require fertilizer once a month. Always use organic fertilizer when feeding your plant.

Pruning: Divide your garlic chives every 2 to 3 years, as this makes them significantly more productive. Flowers should be picked out before maturity to prevent reseeding.

TROUBLESHOOTING

Pests:

Diseases:

HARVEST AND PRESERVE

Harvest: Once your plant is around 6 to 10 inches tall, cut its leaves between 1 to 2 inches of their base or above ground level using a pair of sharp scissors or a knife. Harvesting should be done at maturity, around 60 days after sowing the seeds. Wait for the leaves to reach at least 4 inches tall before harvesting once more.

Preserve: You may either dry or freeze garlic chives

  • Dry garlic chives bundling them and hanging them in a warm, well-ventilated area until dry. Note that because garlic chives have a delicate and subtle taste, drying the chives will run the risk of losing its flavor.
  • Freeze garlic chives by suspending these in ice cubes filled with water or olive oil. Dry-freezing can also be done by vacuum sealing the herbs in a freezer bag and removing any excess air.

CULINARY

  • Caramelized Onion and Chive Sauce
  • Coconut and Seafood Soup with Garlic Chives
  • Stir-fry Chive Blossoms with Pressed Tofu

OTHER INFO

  • The delicate, white flowers of the garlic chives, as well as its stems and buds, are all edible.
  • Provides vitamin(s) A, C, E, K, as well as calcium, iron, selenium and zinc.
  • The leaves of garlic chives are known to be lightly antiseptic, as well as improve digestion and appetite.

MAINTENANCE AND CARE

Water: Water your plant twice a day or every time the soil starts to become dry to touch. Never allow the soil to dry out. Avoid getting the leaves wet when watering and water directly at the base of the plant. Use a spray bottle or sprinkler when watering.

Light: Your plant will grow exceptionally well in a place that receives six (6) hours of sun a day, but may survive on at least four (4) hours of sun a day. Basil will do just fine on a sunny windowsill.

Fertilizing: Your plant will require fertilizer once a month. Always use organic fertilizer when feeding your plant.

Pruning: When seedlings have 3 sets of true leaves (not counting the cotyledons), snip off the top set just above the point where two large leaves meet. Continue this pattern when harvesting, snipping each branch you harvest back to just above its first or second set of leaves. If your plant has started bolt, meaning flower or seed, remove flowering stems to prolong harvest. Regular pruning encourages a more rounded, less leggy plant.

TROUBLESHOOTING

Pests:

Diseases:

HARVEST AND PRESERVE

Harvest: Leaves will have the best flavor when picked before flowers emerge. Morning is the best time of day, but don’t hesitate to pick basil whenever you need it. Also, remove any flower buds and either discard or use as a garnish

Preserve: You may either dry or freeze basil leaves

  • Dry basil by hanging stems upside down in a dark, sheltered location. Poke adequate air holes in the bag for ventilation. Once the leaves are good and dry (about a week), you can crumble them into an airtight container.
  • Freeze basil by packing the leaves tightly in an airtight container or plastic bag with a paper towel to absorb moisture. Simply break off chunks as needed for garden-fresh flavor in recipes.

CULINARY

  • Pesto ala Genovese
  • Basil Ice Cream
  • Crispy Gnocchi With Basil Pesto

OTHER INFO

  • The plant is considered a symbol of love, so bring a bouquet of basil flowers to your next date
  • Provides vitamin(s) K, C, beta-carotene (which is converted into vitamin A), calcium, potassium, magnesium, and iron.
  • Basil has anti-inflammatory properties. It is also used as a digestive aid and to reduce gas, nausea, and stomach cramps. Seed extracts and oil have antibacterial and antiviral properties. Topical applications of basil leaves may help to reduce itching associated with insect bites. The scent is used in aromatherapy to support mental healthy and invigoration. It is prominently used in the ancient Ayurvedic system of India as well.

MAINTENANCE AND CARE

Water: Water your plant twice a day or every time the soil starts to become dry to touch. Never allow the soil to dry out. Avoid getting the leaves wet when watering and water directly at the base of the plant. Use a spray bottle or sprinkler when watering.

Light: Your plant will grow exceptionally well in a place that receives six (6) hours of sun a day. Marjoram will do just fine on a sunny windowsill.

Fertilizing: Your plant will require fertilizer once a month. Always use organic fertilizer when feeding your plant.

Pruning: For perennial plants, remove dead branches and cut back to a third of its size once a year in the summer to promote branching. When plants are just starting, pinch the growing tips to encourage a bushier plant.

TROUBLESHOOTING

Pests:

Diseases:

HARVEST AND PRESERVE

Harvest: Harvest leaves by snipping a whole stem above its lowest set of leaves, starting once the plant is at least 6″ tall. Frequent harvests will promote new growth.

Preserve: You may either dry or freeze oregano leaves

  • Dry marjoram by hanging stems upside down in a dark, sheltered location. Poke adequate air holes in the bag for ventilation. Once the leaves are good and dry (about a week), you can crumble them into an airtight container.
  • Freeze marjoram by packing the leaves tightly in an airtight container or plastic bag with a paper towel to absorb moisture. Simply break off chunks as needed for garden-fresh flavor in recipes.

CULINARY

  • Sautéed Carrots with Lemon and Marjoram Recipe
  • Rice with Herbes de Provence
  • Olive Garden Chicken With Lemon Marjoram Sauce

OTHER INFO

  • Marjoram contains high amounts of iron, and is a source of both vitamins A and C, and calcium. It contains both manganese and vitamin K. Marjoram is used to help calm digestive troubles, such as nausea and bloating. The natural compounds and phytochemicals in Marjoram, carvacrol and thymol, give the herb antiseptic, anti-bacterial, anti-fungal, and anti-inflammatory properties.
  • Marjoram is most often associated with flavoring poultry stuffings or sausages.
  • Marjoram has a long history of use as a medicinal herb. It was associated with love and happiness, purification and healing during ancient times by Greeks, Romans and Europeans. Before hops were widely used to make beer, it was Marjoram and oregano that flavored ales during the Middle Ages.